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Easy GMAT Math Concepts You Can Learn by Heart

February 17, 2015 by

There is  more than one way to solve almost every GMAT math problem you will encounter on the exam. On most problems, you have a choice. You can either:

On GMAT number property questions, knowledge of the properties themselves will often allow you to solve without having to do time-consuming math. These number properties fall into three commonly-tested categories. Get familiar with these categories and practice the skills needed for the GMAT so you can boost your score on GMAT Test Day.

Integers and non-integers

An integer is any whole number: positive, negative, or zero. If you add, subtract, or multiply two integers together, the result will always be an integer. However, if you divide two integers, the result may or may not be an integer.

Even and odd numbers

An even number is … Read full post

Tackling GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions

February 5, 2015 by

For many students studying for the GMAT, the dreaded data sufficiency questions can be a source of consternation. When you really think about it, though, the data sufficiency questions offer one advantage in that they all have the same answer choices. One of the first steps toward success on the GMAT quantitative section is to learn and internalize these answer choices, but you can also learn this great method for eliminating wrong answer choices by determining the applicability of each statement.

GMAT Data Sufficiency Foundations

In case you haven’t committed them to memory yet, here are those familiar choices:

  • (A) Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • (B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked.
  • (C) BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked,
  • Read full post

Master These GMAT Math Skills

January 5, 2015 by

Start the year off strong by diving in to your GMAT prep with vigor (or renewed vigor, as the case may be.) The math section is often the most feared, but the quantitative content on the GMAT is definable and conquerable. Brush up on the math skills that the exam tests and pair this knowledge with solid critical thinking to be successful.

Remember, the concepts presented here are the basics of what the GMAT test.  For advanced concepts and questions, the test makers have unique ways of making these more difficult.

Math Skill #1 – Arithmetic

While arithmetic is foundational in grade school (and a great deal of review for many students), you must study the fundamentals as well as the more advanced concepts.  The GMAT test your ability to:

·  Manipulate fractions, decimals, and ratios (as well as the need to convert among the three)
·  Understand the … Read full post

Top 10 Myths About Your GMAT Score—Debunked!

December 31, 2014 by

At Kaplan Test Prep, we talk to future MBAs every day, so the GMAT is a hot topic of conversation. Those conversations come with their share of myths that are just begging to be busted. So, to celebrate the beginning of 2015, we’re also counting down the top 10 GMAT myths … and then debunking them!

10. GMAT math is really tough. 

False. GMAT math is deceptively simple—high-school-level simple. The GMAT assumes that you have mastered those basic concepts, and it challenges you to a mental duel based on them that requires critical thinking and a strategic approach.

9. I can always pull out my trusty calculator!

Sorry, but you can’t. Other than on the Integrated Reasoning section, there are no calculators allowed on the GMAT. The bad news: if you’re uncomfortable with mental arithmetic, you will struggle. The good news: no calculator means that the GMAT will only … Read full post

The Two Most Common Errors in GMAT Data Sufficiency

December 30, 2014 by

GMAT data sufficiency questions test your ability to analyze a quantitative problem and recognize which information is necessary to figure out the solution.  What a data sufficiency question does NOT test you on is your ability to calculate and number-crunch.  A simpler way of addressing this might be to ask yourself a question as you work through a data sufficiency problem: “Is this enough?”  Keep this in mind as you evaluate (and on test day, avoid) two specific common errors that test-takers make while taking the GMAT.

Error #1: Combining statements when unnecessary

This is done when a test-taker looks at both statements and says “Yes, if I have both pieces of information, then I can figure out the answer, so together the statements are sufficient.”  However, you must remember that you’re also asked if either statement ALONE is enough to answer the question.  Understanding the differences among all … Read full post

GMAT Roman Numerals Questions Revisited

March 13, 2014 by

We covered GMAT Roman Numerals questions recently, and like any good teacher, I want to review this topic again to help solidify it in your mind. So, we challenged students on Facebook with a practice question yesterday that combined Roman Numerals with properties of exponents, and got some great responses.

Take a moment to check out the question and the original blog entry on the shortcut strategy for Roman Numerals questions.

Now, let’s tackle this!

GMAT Roman Numeral Tip

Remember that when you see a Roman Numeral problem, you should think: “I should start with the answer choice that shows up most frequently so that if I can eliminate it, I can mark out the most answer choices.” This will save you time and effort. Remember, every second is valuable on the GMAT, and learning time-saving strategies is every bit as important as (some would argue even MORE important … Read full post

GMAT Problem Solving: Tips for Roman Numeral Questions

March 10, 2014 by

It’s finally time! You’ve waited all weekend for it, and we’re finally going to share the solution, and more importantly, helpful tips for dealing with GMAT Roman Numeral questions. If you didn’t see Friday’s practice question, take a look now:

GMAT Problem Solving
Roman Numeral Question

If x, y, and z are consecutive odd integers, with x < y < z, then which of the following must be true?

I. x + y is even

II.  is an integer

III. xz is even

  • A) I only
  • B) II only
  • C) III only
  • D) I and II only
  • E) I, II, and III

Strategy and Tips for Solving GMAT Roman Numeral Questions

For Roman Numeral questions, start by finding the statement that appears most often in the answer choices, and evaluate it first. Therefore, if it is untrue, you can eliminate the highest number of answer choices.

In this case, … Read full post

GMAT Problem Solving: Roman Numeral Questions

March 7, 2014 by

Have you seen these problems as you study for the GMAT? You know the ones I’m talking about – they have so many components that you put up a mental block almost the second you see them. And to add insult to injury, they increase the visual clutter with Roman numerals.

What do you do when you see these questions? Do you tend to guess and move on?

We’ve got a strategy to help you master these Roman numeral questions, and we’re going to share it. However, for maximum learning value, we’re first going to have you try this practice question on your own.

Here’s a hint to help you out, though: plugging in numbers will help.

GMAT Problem Solving
Roman Numerals Question

If x, y, and z are consecutive odd integers, with x < y < z, then which of the following must be true?

I. x + y … Read full post

GMAT Data Sufficiency Practice Question – The Solution

January 9, 2014 by

Did you try out our GMAT Data Sufficiency practice question? If not, take a couple minutes now to give it a try before reviewing the explanation.

Now, let’s get down to brass tacks on the Geometry and DS skills you need to solve this one…

One way to find the area of a quadrilateral is to divide it into triangles and add the areas of the triangles, which can be found using the formula for the area of a triangle: (1/2)(Base)(Height).
If you add dashed lines to the diagram connecting points A and C and points B and D, you will see that the quadrilateral is composed of 4 right triangles:

You can see that one side of each triangle is a radius of one of the circles; for example, AB is a radius of circle A and is the hypotenuse of triangle ABE. Also, you’ll notice that triangles … Read full post

Free GMAT Question of the Week: Discover Data Sufficiency!

December 9, 2013 by

GMAT Question:

If b ≠ 0 and a > b, is a > c?

(1) a/b> c/b

(2) 5ab > 6bc

From a cursory glance, you can see that GMAT math takes you back to concepts that you learned in high school. Look a bit closer and you see that it actually takes you back much further than that, to math you learned in elementary school – integers, positives/negatives, etc. One of the interesting things about the GMAT is that sometimes these throwbacks to simple math are used to create challenging critical thinking problems. The problem above is one of those.

Post your answer and your method in the comments below. We’ll share the full Kaplan explanation, with secrets for how to master GMAT Data Sufficiency, in tomorrow’s blog entry. … Read full post

 

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