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GMAT Sentence Correction Practice

March 21, 2014 by

Yesterday, we posted a slightly disturbing GMAT Sentence Correction practice question on Facebook. It was mostly disturbing due to the content (creeeepy!), but there was also a lot going on in this particular sentence and the answer choices. Check it out.

As is often the case in GMAT Sentence Correction, this question tests several issues, which you can identify by verbally scanning the answer choices:

  1. “If Professor…is right” versus “Should Professor…(be) right”
  2. Verb tense: “is” versus “had been”
  3. “connection of X and Y” versus “connection between X and Y”

Let’s address these issues one at a time.

  • “If Professor…is right” versus “Should Professor…(be) right”

The GMAT prefers “If Professor…is right” to “Should Professor…(be) right”. The former is simpler and uses the simple present tense to match the later verb “is (not merely coincidental)”. These two verbs must match tense since they describe events that happen simultaneously. Thus you can eliminate … Read full post

Spring Study Tips for the GMAT

March 20, 2014 by

Today is the Vernal Equinox in the northern hemisphere. This marks the beginning of spring, which is a great time for change and celebration – and for us to share some study tips for the GMAT.

Springtime Studies

When we think of the spring, we think of new beginnings. The trees and flowers are waking up (for better or worse, where allergy sufferers are concerned), the birds and frogs start singing again, and we’ve got new, longer hours of daylight now that we’ve changed the clocks. I’ve got a tray of seedlings going, and the tomatoes, basil, and okra are starting to poke their heads out of the soil, reminding me that it’s time to start new things.

Use this time of year to restart or kick-start your GMAT studies, if needed. Are you stalled out, slacking, or just plain burned out? Take a cue from the verdant vernal changes … Read full post

4 Reasons to Take a Free Kaplan GMAT Practice Test

March 17, 2014 by

Why should you sign up for one of the many upcoming Free Online GMAT Practice Tests that Kaplan offers? There are a number of reasons, but here are some of the most important.

1. You need GMAT stamina training

It’s tough to sit still for hours and focus your mental energy on Writing, Integrated Reasoning, Quantitative, and Verbal tasks. Begin your stamina training by trying a GMAT Practice Test to see how it feels to be planted in a chair for a stretch of time with nothing but your critical thinking skills and your math formulas to defend you.

2. You will discover your strengths and opportunities

Once you see your score, you may learn that you’re great at Data Sufficiency, but need to focus a lot more on your reading comprehension skills. Knowing this will help you to focus your study time more efficiently and effectively.

3. You … Read full post

GMAT Math: Happy Pi Day — 3.14

March 14, 2014 by

Happy Pi Day, to all our GMAT Math enthusiasts!! We here at Kaplan know you have been waiting all year for the 14th day of the 3rd month. You are not alone! We share in your excitement that the most glorious day of all annual commemorations has finally arrived. On this Day of Days, people the world over take a moment to laud the sublime ratio that irrationally but nonetheless numerically describes the relationship of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. In not so many words: π = C/d.

Fortunately for you and me, humans love a good challenge. While it is generally accepted that scientists, when calculating with π, only need to take the transcendental number out forty places to the right of the decimal, mankind has banded together over the centuries culminating in the modern use of supercomputing technology for its undoubted intended purpose. We can proudly … Read full post

GMAT Roman Numerals Questions Revisited

March 13, 2014 by

We covered GMAT Roman Numerals questions recently, and like any good teacher, I want to review this topic again to help solidify it in your mind. So, we challenged students on Facebook with a practice question yesterday that combined Roman Numerals with properties of exponents, and got some great responses.

Take a moment to check out the question and the original blog entry on the shortcut strategy for Roman Numerals questions.

Now, let’s tackle this!

GMAT Roman Numeral Tip

Remember that when you see a Roman Numeral problem, you should think: “I should start with the answer choice that shows up most frequently so that if I can eliminate it, I can mark out the most answer choices.” This will save you time and effort. Remember, every second is valuable on the GMAT, and learning time-saving strategies is every bit as important as (some would argue even MORE important … Read full post

Beat GMAT Verbal: Reading Comprehension in a Nutshell

March 11, 2014 by

In this fourth part of a series of posts on the GMAT’s Verbal Section, we take a look at Reading Comprehension (RC) and reveal some key takeaways that mean more points for you on test day. If you’ve not yet read the first two posts in this latest GMAT Verbal series, check out GMAT Verbal: Some Big Ideas, pt. 1, Beat GMAT Verbal by Making Predictions, and GMAT Critical Reasoning: How to Make Predictions. Ideally, read those first then come back in here and let’s crack GMAT RC.

To get mine as many points as possible from these questions, you absolutely must have a standard method for attacking both Reading Comprehension passages and the banks of questions that follow them. Furthermore, it is important to note the adaptive nature of the GMAT’s scoring algorithm. Recall that as you do better on the exam, it gets harder.

On … Read full post

GMAT Problem Solving: Tips for Roman Numeral Questions

March 10, 2014 by

It’s finally time! You’ve waited all weekend for it, and we’re finally going to share the solution, and more importantly, helpful tips for dealing with GMAT Roman Numeral questions. If you didn’t see Friday’s practice question, take a look now:

GMAT Problem Solving
Roman Numeral Question

If x, y, and z are consecutive odd integers, with x < y < z, then which of the following must be true?

I. x + y is even

II.  is an integer

III. xz is even

  • A) I only
  • B) II only
  • C) III only
  • D) I and II only
  • E) I, II, and III

Strategy and Tips for Solving GMAT Roman Numeral Questions

For Roman Numeral questions, start by finding the statement that appears most often in the answer choices, and evaluate it first. Therefore, if it is untrue, you can eliminate the highest number of answer choices.

In this case, … Read full post

Introducing the First GMAT Course eBook for Kindle

March 3, 2014 by

Great news for Kaplan students: we’ve collaborated with Amazon to bring the first GMAT course ebook directly to students enrolled in Kaplan courses using the Kindle reading apps and Kindle Fire tablets. This makes our GMAT course the first Kindle-compatible Kaplan course available for aspiring business school students. Kaplan GMAT students will have the ability to study across multiple devices—Kindle Fire and Android tablets, iPads, PCs and Macs—and take advantage of features such as note taking, highlighting, tracking progress, word look up, searching and syncing.

“Until recently, the adoption of tablets and eBooks for studying has lagged the adoption of eBooks for leisure reading, because studying involves engagement with the book through highlighting, note-taking and other tactile actions,” said Lee Weiss, Executive Director of Emerging Products, Kaplan Test Prep. “But as these functions became more user-friendly in eBook form and device ownership continues to grow, we’re now seeing a demand … Read full post

GMAT Question of the Week: Data Sufficiency and Averages – The Explanation

February 13, 2014 by

If you haven’t already, visit our GMAT Data Sufficiency and Averages practice problem and give it a try on your own before reading the explanation.

To get this question correct, you must combine your knowledge of fundamental math concepts with use of the Kaplan Method and strategies for approaching Data Sufficiency and Averages. Here’s a breakdown:

The average formula is

 

The average of m and n is  

 

The question stem asks  “Is  ?”

 

Remember, with a Yes/No Data Sufficiency question, you are looking at the statements and trying to determine whether they provide a consistent YES or NO answer to this question. A consistent answer of yes OR no is sufficient. An inconsistent answer (yes and no) is insufficient.

 

Statement (1): Sufficient. This statement says that

Pull the 3 out of the numerator to get  

Multiply both sides by 2 to get  

Then divide both sides … Read full post

GMAT Data Sufficiency and Averages

February 11, 2014 by

Who’s afraid of a little GMAT Data Sufficiency and Averages? Not you! Take this one step-by-step to get to the correct answer. Consider timing yourself to see how close you are to the 2 minute suggested average for GMAT DS questions.

Post your answer here in the comments, or on Facebook. We’ll provide a full explanation of this problem in a couple days. Happy practicing!

Edit: The explanation has been added.

 … Read full post

 

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